FLOWERS AT COOMBE OAKS

Simon Coleman

 Spring-Flowers-1

Source: http://cheam.mycouncillor.org.uk/files/2014/04/Spring-Flowers-1.jpg

Towards the end of Jefferies’ last novel, ‘Amaryllis at the Fair’ (1887), a curious character from London turns up in the remote hamlet of Coombe Oaks.  He is Alere Flamma, a Fleet Street artist and engraver, who is bohemian in spirit and widely-travelled.  Jefferies presents him as the artist who is absolutely faithful to the beauty of nature, who knows instinctively what to draw and, above all, who loves wild flowers.

 

“If only Alere would have gone and sketched what he was asked to sketch! Ah! there is the difference; he could not do it, his nature would not let him; he could draw what he saw with his own eyes, but not what other people wanted him to see. A merry income he might have made if he would only have consented to see what other eyes – common, vulgar eyes – wanted to see, and which he could so easily have drawn for them.

 

Out of these piles of varied sketches there were two kinds the Editor instantly snapped at: the one was wild flowers, the other little landscape bits.

 

Wild flowers were his passion. They were to Flamma as Juliet to Romeo. Romeo’s love, indeed, rushed up like straw on fire, a great blaze of flame; he perished in it as the straw; perhaps he might not have worshipped Juliet next year. Flamma had loved his wild flowers close upon forty years, ever since he could remember; most likely longer, for doubtless the dumb infant loved the daisies put in his chubby hand.

 

His passion they were still as he drew near fifty, and saw all things become commonplace. That is the saddest of thoughts – as we grow older the romance fades, and all things become commonplace.

 

Half our lives are spent in wishing for to-morrow, the other half in wishing for yesterday.

 

Wild flowers alone never become commonplace. The white wood-sorrel at the foot of the oak, the violet in the hedge of the vale, the thyme on the wind-swept downs, they were as fresh this year as last, as dear to-day as twenty years since, even dearer, for they grow now, as it were, in the earth we have made for them of our hopes, our prayers, our emotions, our thoughts.

 

Sketch-book upon sketch-book in Alere’s room was full of wild flowers, drawn as he had found them in the lanes and woods at Coombe Oaks – by the footpaths, by the lake and the lesser ponds, on the hills – as he had found them, not formed into an artificial design, not torn up by the roots, or cut and posed for the occasion – exactly as they were when his eye caught sight of them. A difficult thing to do, but Alere did it.

 

In printing engravings of flowers the illustrated magazines usually make one of two mistakes; either the flower is printed without any surroundings or background, and looks thin, quite without interest, however cleverly drawn, or else it is presented with a heavy black pall of ink which dabs it out altogether.

 

These flowers the Editor bought eagerly, and the little landscapes. From a stile, beside a rick, through a gap in a hedge, odd, unexpected places, Alere caught views of the lake, the vale, the wood, groups of trees, old houses, and got them in his magical way on a few square inches of paper. They were very valuable for book illustration. They were absolutely true to nature and fact.”